Wow, June flew so fast! It is already the last Wednesday of the month; next Wednesday, July is going to commence. Whoa. Since it is Wednesday, it also means one thing – time for another WWW Wednesday update. WWW Wednesday is a bookish meme was originally hosted by SAM@TAKING ON A WORLD OF WORDS. The mechanics for WWW Wednesday is quite simple. You just have to answer three questions:

  1. What are you currently reading?
  2. What have you finished reading?
  3. What will you read next?

www-wednesdays


What are you currently reading?

61yeguQxH6L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_

At nearly 800 pages (surprisingly), it looks like this is going to be my final read this month. I’ve been immersing in American works in June and Thomas Pynchon’s Gravity’s Rainbow sounds like a great way of rounding it up. Admittedly, I am daunted by the book. It is not only because of its length but also because it was written by an author whose work I’ve never read of before. Actually, it was just a couple of years ago that I first heard of Pynchon. A virtual recluse, he is surrounded by enigma that naturally piqued my curiosity. I forgot the author I was researching on when I first encountered Pynchon’s name but the article made out that Pynchon rarely makes his presence felt.

I just started the book and it brought me to a very familiar territory – the Second World War. I haven’t researched on the book (I rarely do) so it came as a pleasant surprise. I’m tempering my expectations because I don’t want to have my hopes too high up. I just want to enjoy the book and learn more about Pynchon as an author,


What have you finished reading?

I guess my momentum has picked up as I managed to complete two books in seven days for the second consecutive week.

Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian was meant to be an icebreaker after having three heavy reads (Stockett’s The Help, Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom!, and Frazier’s Cold Mountain). It was also a book I’ve been looking forward to for years although I don’t understand why I let it sit for too long in my bookshelf. I knew it was going to be a good read and I wasn’t wrong. There was an honesty and sincerity behind the words that just compelled me. I am no fan of young adult fiction but this is one of those gems. It has autobiographical elements and maybe that is the reason why it was easy understanding and connecting with the main character, Arnold Spirit, Jr. I just hoped that it touched more on Indian culture  but overall, it did enough to get my interest.

Nobel Laureate in Literature John Steinbeck is a familiar territory already as I have read three of his works (The Pearl, Cannery Row and Of Mice and Men). However, The Grapes of Wrath is uncharacteristically longer than the three books I’ve already read. It relates the story of the Joad family. Set during the Great Depression, they were forced to travel from their native Oklahoma to California in hopes of finding a job. The land they were tilling was requisitioned by the bank. As always, it was a heavy read and must be read slowly for one to appreciate the narrative. The discrimination, the violence, and the swirl of emotions made me understand why it was given the title The Grapes of Wrath. 


What will you read next?

During my last WWW Wednesday post, I included James Baldwin’s semi- autobiographical work, Go Tell It On The Mountain to be part of my June reading month. However, due to Gravity’s Rainbow’s length, I think the task at hand is going to be impossible, if not challenging. I am then resetting my list ready for July and these three books are going to take the center stage.

Kate Elizabeth Russell’s My Dark Vanessa and Abi Dare’s The Girl With the Louding Voice are both part of my 2020 Top 10 Books I Look Forward to List. After a lengthy research, their premises piqued my curiosity enough that I included them in the list. The positive reviews and recommendations from fellow book bloggers made it imperative for me to immerse in them next. My Dark Vanessa stirred quite the controversy. Equally controversial is Jeanine Cummins’ American Dirt. It is this intrigue that pulled me towards it. Despite this, I came across some positive response so I guess it isn’t that bad at all.

I am giddy in anticipation already for I have three different authors from seemingly different backgrounds whose works I’m reading for the first time. More importantly, each wrote about subjects that are timely and relevant. And thus concludes another WWW Wednesday update! I hope everyone is having a great midweek! As the Koreans go, “Hwaiting” (or “Fighting”) for the rest of the week! Do keep safe and as always, enjoy reading!